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Best gundam model 2018 – [Buyer’s Guide]

Last Updated December 1, 2018
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Brayden DiazLet’s get started. Let’s discuss this topic to help you select best gundam model for 2018 and take your experience to a whole new level with aerators.

Just read here for my top 3 recommendations. Why are these 3 gundam model on top of my list? Well read on… Without further-a-do, let’s take a look at the Top 3 list in 2018 which are available in the market.

Best gundam model of 2018

If you’re reading this, it is very likely that you’re scouting for the best gundam model. I’ve based my selection methodology on customer feedback, the size, functionality, and budget to meet various demands.

The “Total” indicates the overall value of the product. Come with me.

Test Results and Ratings

Rank №1 №2 №3
Product
Total 4.8 4.5 4.3
Design
5 points
5 points
4 points
Versatility
5 points
4 points
4 points
Durability
4 points
4 points
4 points
Quality
5 points
5 points
5 points
Awards 1
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How to save up to 86%? Here is little trick.

You must visit the page of sales. Here is the link. If you don’t care about which brand is better, then you can choose the gundam model by the price and buy from the one who will offer the greatest discount.

 

 

№1 – Gundam Modeler Basic Tools – Gundam Model Kits / Model Building Craft Starter Set for Car Bendai Hobby Model Assemble Building With Plastic Container by Baleauty

 
Gundam Modeler Basic Tools - Gundam Model Kits / Model Building Craft Starter Set for Car Bendai Hobby Model Assemble Building With Plastic Container by Baleauty

Pros
♥ BEST STARTER SET! – Suitable for both beginner and advanced modeler, and it’s a great all-around set of tools for those looking to start building model kits
♥ VERY HELPFUL LITTLE SET! – 13 in all including the box. The items contained within are all of pretty mediocre quality but there’s plenty of stuff in the kit and really it’s all you need to get started
Cons
Absolutely no frills
 
Total:
4.8

Why did this gundam model win the first place?

The product is very strong. Its material is stable and doesn’t crack. I am very happy with the purchase. It is definitely worth its money. The product is top-notch! I really enjoy the design. It is compact, comfortable and reliable. And it looks amazing! I also liked the delivery service that was fast and quick to react. It was delivered on the third day.

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Design
5

5star

Versatility
5

5star

Durability
4

4star

Quality
5

5star

 

 

№2 – Gundam Modeler Basic Tools Craft Set For Car Model Assemble Building Kit by Alemon

 
Gundam Modeler Basic Tools Craft Set For Car Model Assemble Building Kit by Alemon

Pros
This modeler basic tools set is suitable for a begin and advanced modeler as well.
1xSide cutter,1x Pen knife& 12 spare blade and sawblade File, 2 type Tweezer.
3xdouble-sided polished bar,1x transparent box.1x part separater.
Cons
Hard to use.
It gets scratched easily..
 
Total:
4.5

Why did this gundam model come in second place?

This is a pretty decent product that perfectly fitted the interior of our office. Managers explained me all the details about the product range, price, and delivery. I like this product. For such a low price, I didn’t even hope it to be any better. It’s decently made. Seems that the material is good. It has a very beautiful color but I don’t really like the texture.

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Design
5

5star

Versatility
4

4star

Durability
4

4star

Quality
5

5star

 

 

№3 – BXQINLENX 25 PCS Gundam Modeler Basic Tools Craft Set For Car Model Assemble Building

 
BXQINLENX 25 PCS Gundam Modeler Basic Tools Craft Set For Car Model Assemble Building

Pros
● FUNCTION—EASY TO USE—The modeler basic tools set is suitable for a beginner and advanced modeler as well.You can use it to manufacture many toys,such as cars, robots, cartoon, buildings, airplanes and other crafts.
● FULL RANGE AND COST EFFICIENT—Package include : 1 X Cutting pad;1 X Pen knife and 1 X blade;1 X Steel rule;2 X Tweezers;1 X Scissor;2 X Polishing block;1 X Knife;5 X Files;1 X Hand drill;1 X 10pcs Drills;4 X Knife stones:4 X Sandpaper.
Cons
Relatively pricey to buy.
It is pretty heavy..
 
Total:
4.3

Why did this gundam model take third place?

A very convenient model. It is affordable and made of high-quality materials. It doesn’t squeaks nor bents. Looks great in my apartment. I liked the design. We’ve been using it for 2 months and it still looks like brand new. It is inconvenient to use due to the size. I am going to get something different next time.

banner2


Design
4

4star

Versatility
4

4star

Durability
4

4star

Quality
5

5star

 

 

gundam model Buyer’s Guide

If you keep the before points in mind, you can easily go out to the market and buy gundam model, right? No!

Size and Scale

Gundam models, like most other plastic models have an accompanying original to model ratio, or scale. A 1/100 kit would be roughly 100 times smaller than actual size of the object the kit represents. A 1/60 scale kit would only be 60 times smaller resulting in a larger model.

Grade & Size

Kits released by Bandai are generally categorized based on their size and level of complexity. Kits within a category usually share the same scale although exceptions are sometimes made for units of odd sizes. For example the Musha Gundam, in its universe, is considerably larger than its Gundam brothers. However for the sake of simplicity Bandai scaled it down to use the 1/100 MKII frame. The upside to this discrepancy that kits within the same scale tend to be pretty similar in height and size except for a few which are substantially smaller or larger. Together these consistencies make it easier for fans to purchase a kit with accurate expectations regarding the difficulty and end result.

No Grade

While not technically a stated grade, No Grade generally refers to 1/100 and 1/14kits that haven’t been released to the specifications of High or Master Grade. The cheapest of the kits, no grade models feature the simplest engineering and details. They often require a good amount of painting and touch ups to look their best. Within the last decade the quality of no grade kits has jumped tremendously and modern releases are on par with older High Grade kits.

Real Grade

Real Grade kits are a newer line from Bandai, released following their 30th anniversary. They bridge the gap between High Grade and Master Grade while retaining the 1/14scale. They’re highly poseable, highly detailed, and come molded in all of the appropriate colors. Almost no painting is required for a fantastic looking kit. Unfortunately the complex designs often leave the kits feeling more fragile than other grades and that complexity makes them better suited for experienced builders.

Master Grade

Master Grade are a step up in size and quality. At 1/100 scale they are often cast and engineered to look great without painting. Unlike HGs, most feature internal skeletons with large amounts of detail. They’re also more expensive thanks in part to the additional gimmicks not found with their smaller brethren. For example, some kits have individual articulating fingers or the ability to transform. For the most part, skill requirements between HG and MG kits are rather minor. MG kits just take a bit more time and patience to build.

For modelers not looking to paint, Master Grade kits are a great choice as more pieces are molded in their correct colour already. Over the years some kits have received second and third variation releases to take advantage of the improving technologies. v2.0 kits have been re-engineered from the ground up and are considerable improvements over their earlier counterparts. Many MG kits also have the additional title, “Ver. Ka,” having been designed and stylized by Gundam designer Hajime Katoki.

Perfect Grade 

Perfect Grade kits are Bandai’s top of the line kits. They’re some of the largest, at 1/60 scale, and some of the most expensive. PGs take a lot of time and patience to put together featuring complex and highly detailed construction. The end result is a highly poseable kit with tons of detail. Internal detail is taken to a maximum and many PG kits come with gimmicks not seen on lower levels. PG kits also come with light up eyes and other components, a feature only starting to make its way into some MG releases.

Super Deformed

SD Gundam kits are small, non-scale kits from nearly every series alongside many original designs. They’re quick, easy to build, and mostly inexpensive. There’s very little in the way of pose-ability or articulation as they generally consist of five or so main pieces. Since they’re generally molded in two or three colours SD kits come with large stickers to help detail the kit.

That’s it for the main grades and sizes. Over the years Bandai has released kits in various other scales (such as 1/400 or 1/500) depending on the size of the unit itself. Bandai also has a tendency to re-release kits with extra finishes or clear armor pieces. Most popular are the chrome finishes which adorn popular kits from each grade.

Lesser Known Collections

In addition to the previously listed Bandai released a few kits under the Hard Graph title. These kits are 1/3in scale and are highly detailed, military model style models. Speed Grade kits are the cheapest of the cheap and 1/200 in scale. Bandai only made four.

Several ships and larger mobile armors have been released as 1/400 and 1/550 scale models. Ships on a smaller scale have been released as part of the EX Model line (1/1600 and 1/1700) with smaller units at 1/14and 1/100.

Where to Shop

When it comes to where you should buy a Gunpla model from the simple answer is wherever you can get a good deal. Online, at conventions, or even your own local hobby shop.

Finding a local store which sells Gunpla is a relatively difficult process for folks in the US. Despite its popularity, Gunpla is still a niche market compared to military and vehicle scale models, which have been waning in popularity over the past two decades. The only large scale chain store I know which carries Gunpla is Barns and Noble who’ve had select kits online and in a limited amount of stores.

If you can find and browse Gunpla at local hobby store, please do so. It’s a great way to promote Gundam and support your local shop, whom you’ll likely be visiting again for paint and other supplies. Just be sure to price check because costs and markups can fluctuate quite a bit. Remember to factor in shipping and the convenience of getting it locally. Gunpla distributor, Bluefin Distribution, supplies retailers in the US though not all carry Gundams. You can use Bluefin’s Dealer Locator to see if there are any potential shops near you.

Shipping from Japan

If you order a kit from Japan be prepared to make a choice, SAL or EMS (sometimes a proper shipping company like FedEx). SAL, “Surface Air Lifted,” is your basic international shipping method. Compared to EMS it is incredibly slow, your package could arrive anywhere between two weeks and three months. Base SAL doesn’t have any tracking information but some special versions of SAL do. Unfortunately this isn’t very accurate and has more to do with delivery verification than tracking. SAL is also the slowest going through customs which is where packages spend most of the time sitting around.

EMS is the fastest, and most expensive, shipping method. “Express Mail Service” is, as it says, express. It gets priority access to flight space and through customs. EMS also includes tracking so you can monitor the package’s process.

After the recent success of

Gundam Build Fighters, a meta show about fans building Gunpla, the plastic model building hobby is enjoying a renaissance. It’s never been easier to get your hands on Gunpla anywhere in the world. What makes Gunpla so appealing is how it scales to a challenge for any experience level. At its most involved, craftspeople apply their own paint and custom touches to enter global tournaments, where the real life Meijin Kawaguchi first made a name for himself. At its most basic, Gunpla is something you can learn to do in an afternoon.

This is a beginner tutorial for anyone who’s interested in constructing their first Gunpla. Follow along to learn how easy and accessible this hands-on hobby can be.

Choosing Your First Gunpla

Scale, or size, indicates how large the model will be once it is built. Take a 1/14model, which is said to be exactly 144th the size of the “real” mobile suit, if it existed. For example, the “life size” Gundam model in Odaiba, Japan would be said to be 1/scale. Scale has been standardized since the ‘90s, and you can typically choose from 1/144, 1/100, and 1/60.

Super Deformed, with varying difficulty. The grade is shortened to two letters in the corner of the Gunpla box—HG, MG, PG, etc.

Building Your First Gunpla

Notice that the instructions consist of images, with hardly any text at all. To build a Gunpla, all you need to be able to do is duplicate the image in front of you with the parts you have.

Let’s start with step one, which tells us to take out piece IThe letter refers to the sprue, or plastic runner into which the piece is embedded, while the number refers to the part itself. On the sprue, you will easily find the number next to the piece it identifies. Using this convention, you can quickly find any piece you need.

Notice also that this sprue is bright yellow, the same as the picture on the front of the kit. Since Gunpla come pre-colored, you do not need to paint anything.

Let’s take out piece IGunpla kits are designed so you could do this with your fingers if you want. It really is that easy! However, as you get deeper into the hobby, you’ll notice that most people use side-cutters, which look like extremely small gardening shears. You can buy wire side-cutters in the jewelry aisle at the craft store. If you have the opportunity, you can also buy side-cutters designed for hobbyists. I have been using Tamiya hobby side-cutters that I bought on for years, but recently switched to Gundam Planet side-cutters designed specifically for Gunpla. Your side-cutter choice—or using side-cutters at all—is entirely up to you.

Looks like we need to connect Iwith I8, which is the back of the head. Believe it or not, you won’t need any glue to do this. Gunpla are snap-together kits, with little pegs and notches through which the pieces will connect to one another and stay connected forever. Even more advanced modelers do not use glue on their Gunpla, because it makes them less poseable.

Next I take out more pieces for assembly, I do not recommend taking out more than the amount you need for one step, or you might get confused or lose pieces. The extra pieces I’m adding to Iand Imake up Beargguy’s ears and muzzle.

I took out I8, but it has a little nub sticking out that I don’t like. So I’m going to remove this imperfection with my X-Acto knife. All I’m doing here is slicing off the nub that sticks out so my finished Gunpla is smoother. You can get an X-Acto knife at the craft store.

Having cleaned the pieces up with my knife, I will assemble them by snapping them together.

Almost there! Petit Beargguy has no features. So I’m going to use the stickers that came with the kit to fill in the eyes and nose. I could use my fingers, but I’m using tweezers here for increased precision and to avoid getting my fingers’ oil on the sticker and making it lose its stickiness.

All right! That’s the completed Beargguy head. We put this together without paint, glue, or reading any Japanese. We used some tools for sure, but that was my decision, not a necessity. By following the instructions, anyone can build Gunpla.

For nearly four decades, Mobile Suit Gundam has defined the giant robot genre, and anime in general. As much an examination of war as a simple action series, Gundam can be intimidating for new viewers… but it doesn’t have to be.

Welcome back to the Gizmodo Guide series, where we take an introductory but comprehensive look at the most important universes of science fiction and fantasy. These guides are aimed at lay-people in search of a quick refresher, as well as seasoned fans who want to debate the meaning and essential knowledge of a subject.

A Brief History of Gundam

Mobile Suit Gundam was released in 1979, and it changed everything. Series like Mazinger Z or Tetsujin 28-go (which would come to the west as Gigantor) had popularised the “Super Robot” genre.

But at first, nobody appreciated Mobile Suit Gundam’s approach to giant robots as the tools of futuristic militaries for use in global wars, rather than superheroes fighting fantastical monsters. Mobile Suit Gundam was almost canceled before its run of episodes was even completed, but the sudden explosion in popularity of toy model kits based on robots from the series saw a huge spike in the series’ popularity.

When Mobile Suit Gundam first aired in Japan, the only toys available featuring the robots from the show were “Chokogin” die-cast models made by Clover. Chokogin were extremely popular in Japan throughout the 1970s, but after Mobile Suit Gundam failed to catch on, Clover gave up the licence. Bandai purchased the rights to make Gundam toys, but instead of making more die-cast figures, they made plastic model kits — kits that, after being constructed, made articulated, multi-coloured models of the various Mobile Suits from the show. Unlike anything else on the market at the time, Bandai’s kits were wildly successful, prompting a re-release of Mobile Suit Gundam in Japanese theatres and repeat showings on television, reigniting interest in a franchise that had seemed to be over for good.

Although Western audiences got their first taste of the “Real Robot” genre through Robotech’s arrival to the U.S in the mid-1980s, Gundam as a franchise would not find footing outside of Japan until the arrival of the seventh series in the franchise, New Mobile Report Gundam Wing. Following its airing in Japan in 1995, the series was translated for Western audiences as Mobile Suit Gundam Wing in 2000, and aired in both edited and unedited formats — a first for Cartoon Network and one of the first anime series in America to do so. Although Gundam Wing was not considered to be incredibly popular in Japan, it was a big hit in the U.S., sparking a new interest in the series that continues to this day, with new Gundam series being translated for Western audiences on a regular basis.

At the time of its inception Mobile Suit Gundam was a revolutionary take on discussing allegories to War in Japan, even at a time 30 years after the end of World War II — and as time has passed, Gundam itself has evolved to tackle more debates than just the nature of war as the series has evolved. Debates about national identity, and even touchy issues like racism, have served as the thrust for the human conflicts of Gundam. Debates about the necessity of militarization have even been spurred by the series, another interesting subject given Japan’s own evolving relationship with its armed forces. For the Japanese, Gundam asks a lot of important questions that has helped to keep itself culturally relevant for decades, even while remaining a series that’s largely about giant robots fighting each other.

Regild Century

But despite the fact that Gundam has spread itself across all these different timelines, the vast majority of the series have shared a thematic core that ties Mobile Suit Gundam as a franchise together, beyond the trademark Gundams themselves: the interplay between Earth and its colonies over the right to self-rule, and an exploration the human side of global conflict (both in terms of soldiers and civilians).

Even though each different Gundam often shares thematic similarities, though, picking a good starting point to enter the franchise is still important — oftentimes, the way Gundam approaches these big themes can be reflected in the time period each series was created in, so it helps to have some context to better understand each particular series you’re getting into. It also helps on an aesthetic level — some of Gundam’s best storytelling can be challenging to experience as a newcomer, due to it being presented in now-dated animation styles.

Many of these timelines only have one series to their name, essentially making them quasi-spinoffs to the larger series. But here’s the skinny on some of the more important timelines which have been the most developed in the Gundam universe, and a few of the most notable standalone series.

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How to save up to 86%? Here is little trick.

You must visit the page of sales. Here is the link. If you don’t care about which brand is better, then you can choose the gundam model by the price and buy from the one who will offer the greatest discount.

 

 

Final Word

First of all thanks for reading my article to the end! I hope you find my reviews listed here useful and that it allows you to make a proper comparison of what is best to fit your needs and budget. Don’t be afraid to try more than one product if your first pick doesn’t do the trick.

Most important, have fun and choose your gundam model wisely! Good luck!

So, TOP3 of gundam model

 

 

Questions? Leave a comment below!

Chatting about gundam model is my passion! Leave me a question in the comments, I answer each and every one and would love to get to know you better!



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