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Best key lock box 2018 – [Buyer’s Guide]

Last Updated December 1, 2018
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Brayden DiazHey friends! I’ve got something important to talk about today! After spending over 47 hours comparing at least 24 key lock box, I am recommending the best key lock box of 2018

Just read here for my top 3 recommendations. Why are these 3 key lock box on top of my list? Well read on… In this section we provide our readers with a comparison table of our top picks. Scroll past the table for a closer look at each of the 3 best key lock box in our review section.

Best key lock box of 2018

Now, let’s get to the gist of the matter: which are the best key lock box for the money? Many brands have introduced key lock box on the market. These brands have resulted in a variety for the user. These require that the consumers be well aware of what they are buying so as to make the best choice. I make the search easier for you, by reviewing the best key lock box on the market. Simply review and buy them.

Test Results and Ratings

Rank №1 №2 №3
Product
Total 4.8 4.5 4.3
Design
5 points
5 points
4 points
Size
5 points
4 points
4 points
Performance
4 points
4 points
4 points
Price
5 points
5 points
5 points
Awards 1
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How to save up to 86%? Here is little trick.

You must visit the page of sales. Here is the link. If you don’t care about which brand is better, then you can choose the key lock box by the price and buy from the one who will offer the greatest discount.

 

 

№1 – Kingsley Guard-a-key Black Realtor’s Lockbox

 
Kingsley Guard-a-key Black Realtor's Lockbox

Pros
Durable All Metal Construction
Fits Over 5 Keys
10,000 Possible Combinations
Cons
Not found yet.
 
Total:
4.8

Why did this key lock box win the first place?

I also liked the delivery service that was fast and quick to react. It was delivered on the third day. I really enjoy the design. It is compact, comfortable and reliable. And it looks amazing! I am very happy with the purchase. It is definitely worth its money. The product is top-notch! The product is very strong. Its material is stable and doesn’t crack.

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Design
5

5star

Size
5

5star

Performance
4

4star

Price
5

5star

 

 

№2 – ORIA Key Storage Lock Box

 
ORIA Key Storage Lock Box

Pros
Durable material: This key lock box is made of zinc alloy and heavy-duty steel, which can protect the box from hammering, sawing or prying. Also, it is environmentally friendly paint, so it isn’t harmful to the body
High security: This product is an adjustable combinations lock with 4 dials. It can offer 10000 combination. It can be converted to non-resettable mode for extra security
Cons
A bit bulky.
Cheap feeling construction.
 
Total:
4.5

Why did this key lock box come in second place?

I like this product. For such a low price, I didn’t even hope it to be any better. It’s decently made. This is a pretty decent product that perfectly fitted the interior of our office. Seems that the material is good. It has a very beautiful color but I don’t really like the texture. Managers explained me all the details about the product range, price, and delivery.

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Design
5

5star

Size
4

4star

Performance
4

4star

Price
5

5star

 

 

№3 – Puroma Key Lock Box Keys Safe Storage Security Combination Lock Box with 4-Digit Combination for Realtor Construction Seniors Family and Friends

 
Puroma Key Lock Box Keys Safe Storage Security Combination Lock Box with 4-Digit Combination for Realtor Construction Seniors Family and Friends

Pros
Portable use: Use as a combination lock as well as a lock box; besides, compared to wall-mount lock box, Puroma lock box with over-a-knob shackle design, allows being hung exactly where you need
High security: 4 digits offer up to 10,000 possible combinations whil build in zinc alloy and heavy-duty steel for durability
Cons
Some people don’t like this design.
The handles break easily.
 
Total:
4.3

Why did this key lock box take third place?

I liked the design. We’ve been using it for 2 months and it still looks like brand new. A very convenient model. It is affordable and made of high-quality materials. It doesn’t squeaks nor bents. Looks great in my apartment. It is inconvenient to use due to the size. I am going to get something different next time.

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Design
4

4star

Size
4

4star

Performance
4

4star

Price
5

5star

 

 

key lock box Buyer’s Guide

If you keep the before points in mind, you can easily go out to the market and buy key lock box, right? No!

Item Weight:  1.lbs.

KeyGuard cabinet comes in on the 8th position thanks to its impressive features like the fact that it provides keyless operation. After all, what’s the essence of getting a key lock box if it comes with a key for you carry around? That’s like trampling upon the very role it’s designed to play, right? It comes with easy to use buttons which make the entry of your home by your friends and relates a breeze, while at the same time making entry by uninvited guests and intruders a rock.

Two years ago, we chose the best lockbox after spending hours on research, interviews, and tryouts, as well as shadowing professional locksmiths as they mimicked burglar break-ins. For this update, we scoured the field for new entries that could meet our standards—and we found none. Our original pick, the Kidde AccessPoint KeySafe, remains the best lockbox available, hands down.

No new lockboxes can match the strong combination of security and price of our current pick—the Kidde AccessPoint KeySafe. This year, we’ve added a new pick for a vehicle-mounted lockbox. For simply hiding a spare key, we’re sticking with our low-tech fake rock pick.

How we picked

Despite their limited market, lockboxes come in a bewildering variety of forms and are sold under multiple brand names. To cut through the tangle, we first spoke with locksmiths and realtors for advice. Our conversations revealed a consensus: The most secure lockboxes are wall-mounted models made of solid metal and attached by concealed screws. A determined thief with a crowbar or sledgehammer might consider breaking into one, but actually doing so would cause a scene and draw too much attention—and quash any burglar’s grand plan.

These wall-mount boxes make a mockery of the alternative: shackle-style boxes with a U-loop that goes over a doorknob or gate for convenience. We categorically reject these for use on homes and rental units. As one locksmith explained, a quick snip with bolt cutters will get through the loop on most models. Then the perp can take the box away and use all of his faculties to break in without worrying about onlookers.

Our locksmiths then helped us decide between locking mechanisms. There are three common types: wheels, which employ tumblers marked with numbers or letters; push buttons, on which you punch in a numerical code payphone-style; and dials, on which you enter the combination with a rotating dial, like on a classic school padlock.

Wheel models dropped out of consideration almost immediately: Our locksmiths emphasized how easy it is to insert a thin metal shim between the tumblers and work out the the combination by feel.

Push-button boxes are simple to operate—kids can do it, which is a real selling point—but they have a significant drawback: The numbers can be pressed in any sequence (so if your combo is 3-2-1, you can also open it by pressing 2-1-3, or 1-2-3). That dramatically reduces the effective number of possible combinations, which in turn reduces security. Plus, when trying to crack push-button locks, burglars (and locksmiths) first simply look for the extra wear-and-tear on the combo’s numbers. To avoid that vulnerability, you have to change the combination with some regularity. That can be confusing for infrequent users and kids. And be honest: How high is changing the combo going to be on your list of chores? The simplicity of push-button locks is attractive, but it’s also a bit of a liability.

Flaws but not dealbreakers

If there’s a downside to the Kidde, it’s that it’s a bit more difficult to set up than push-button models—setting the code requires manipulating a set of internal discs and takes about 1minutes. But we (and our experts) feel strongly that the extra security is worth that minor hassle.

Cheap and simple, this fake rock is not at all secure, but it can keep a spare key safe—just make sure you put it in a discreet location.

Pull Quote

We looked hard to find the best fake rock, and this is the one we’d get.

For certain outdoor activities—surfing is a big one—bringing your car keys along is inconvenient. Locking them securely to your vehicle instead is an attractive option, and for that, we recommend the shackle version of our wall-mounted, dial-lock pick: the Kidde AccessPoint Portable.

As stated above, all shackle models have a significant built-in weakness: the shackle can be cut, allowing the thief to retreat somewhere private to break open the box and steal the key. So, again, don’t use a shackle model on your house or rental property. It would be too easy for someone to walk up as though they were an innocent visitor, pop the shackle, and disappear with your key. And when using one on your car or truck, take a couple of extra steps to boost security. Conceal the lockbox in the undercarriage or engine compartment, locking the shackle around something anchored and robust: a shock strut or engine-block mount, for example. Don’t shackle it to the car door handle, as at least one manufacturer suggests, because it’ll become an obvious target in an empty parking lot. And the more confined the space you put the lockbox in, the harder you’ll make it for a thief to put a pry bar or pair of bolt cutters into action. So tuck the box behind a wheel or in a tight spot under the hood (provided you can pop the hood from outside, that is!).

The competition

There are dozens of different lockboxes out there, but once we learned how flimsy wheel locks and button locks are, we dismissed a majority of competitors. The Master Lock 5400D, for example, can be had with a bit of metal and some sensitive fingertips. That meant we couldn’t recommend models like this one from Vault Locks, either.

Button locks present more options, but they, too, are susceptible to a break-in by an expert. That includes models like this one from KeyGuard, and the push-button version of our Kidde dial-lock pick.

We also tested the Master Lock 5900D, but the plastic exterior and thin cable connector made it feel fragile. The wheel combo system, of course, is easy to crack.

Lock lingo

Over the two decades that we’ve been putting together our intensive and independent lock tests we’ve always used a combination of manual and power tools, and force and finesse to try and break locks.

This time we’ve upped our game, significantly, by using the facilities of Germany’s biggest security manufacturer, Abus, and more importantly its state-of-the-art test labs, and training on how to use the machines on offer.

We devised a full-on torture chamber of tests that fully simulate each and every way a lock is attacked and broken. For this we needed multiple models from each manufacturer, so thank you to those who took up the challenge and supplied test samples willingly.

With nine tests on a total of 2different models (2are shown here with seven reviews below), that’s 26separate tests, and a total of in excess of £11,000 worth of locks tested to destruction…

D-locks or U-locks

The D-lock, or U-lock as it is alternatively known, is the classic bike lock. The design consists of a big shackle and toughened crossbar with the lock mechanism built in. It’s been around for years, and it’s really just a supersized padlock. The benefits are the strength for its size and relative portability.

Stand-Alone Locks as the name implies are an “all-in-one” access control system for a single-door. The lock powered by replaceable internal batteries can be unlocked by keypad, proximity card or a combination. The advantages of stand-alone locks are they can be installed and operational in minutes. Some offer hand-held readers that extract the audit trail from the lock. The disadvantages of stand-alone locks are they are stand-alone and not part of a broader network.

Proximity readers are the most popular option in commercial access control. They are easy to use, and when cards are lost, it is a simple matter to deactivate them and issue new ones. They can also be combined with photo IDs for additional security. Proximity cards, which can work from one inch to three feet from a sensor, are the most common. Because there is no contact between the card and reader, they are very reliable and suffer little wear and tear. They are also inexpensive. A specialized type of proximity card is the automobile tag, which allows access to a parking facility without requiring the driver to open their window or get out of the car. Automobile tags can work at hundreds of feet away from a sensor. Security access systems can use magnetic stripe or barcode cards, as well, and these can be a money‐saving option if you already use one of these technologies for employee ID cards.

Keyswitches offer electronic auditing through a network while continuing to use a physical key to activate the lock. are common for single door security access and less expensive systems. They are easy to use but less secure, since users have a tendency to write down the entry code or to “lend” it to others. They also do not provide detailed audit trails until you provide unique codes to each individual.

Biometric systems rely on physical characteristics of the users for identification such as fingerprints, handprints, or even retinal scans. They are by far the most secure methods of access control. However, they are also considerably more expensive and can seem invasive to employees forced to use them constantly. Early models proved less unreliable outdoors, so they were not recommended for exterior security access.

To ensure free pass to exit a secure door, all locking systems include a quick exit device. Examples include; push-to-exit buttons, request-to exit bars, motion detectors, emergency (break-glass) exit and Time delayed exit. These buttons are mounted in the interior, on the casing surrounding the door (mullion mount) or on a wall near the door (gang mount). Examples of Egress Device types follow. ‘Clicking’ on any of the device photos will open a new window with direct access to pricing, and product datasheets for further and more detailed reference.

Push-To-Exit Buttons as the name implies Push-To-Exit buttons are wall mounted near the exit point and contain directions on a large green or red button. Depressing the button releases the door.

Push Bars attach across the inside of the door at the height of the door latch. You exit the door by pressing against the bar. The action of pressing the bar releases the latch and the door opens.

Emergency Exits attach on a wall near the exit point. Emergency exits are available is two general types, the first is a ‘break-glass’ model. To gain exit, you break the glass face. The action depresses a button inside the switch and releases the door. The second type uses a pull down handle to release the door.

Delayed Egress function by starting a timer once the device is activated. Delayed egress can include voice commands and sounds explaining the door will open in ‘x’ seconds. For example, once depressed. a delayed egress can count down from 1seconds to zero and then release the latch opening the door. Delayed egress devices provide the emergency opening functional of a free exit system while providing a delay for enhanced security.

In all locking systems, the locking device represents the physical security barrier. Locking devices include Magnetic Locks (Maglocks), Electric strikes, Deadbolts, Magnetic Shear Locks and Electrified locksets. These devices are mounted on the door and door casing. Examples of Locking Device types follow. ‘Clicking’ on any of the device photos will open a new window with direct access to pricing, and product datasheets for further and more detailed reference.

Lockset

Magnetic Locks electromagnetic lock, magnetic lock, or maglock is a locking device that consists of an electromagnet and armature plate. By attaching the electromagnet to the door frame and the armature plate to the door, a current passing through the electromagnet attracts the armature plate holding the door shut. Unlike an electric strike a magnetic lock has no interconnecting parts and is therefore less suitable for super high security applications because it is possible to bypass the lock by disrupting the power supply. Nevertheless, the strength of today’s magnetic locks compares well above that of conventional door locks and they cost less than conventional light bulbs to operate. Power supplies incorporating a trickle-charged lead-acid battery pack should be used to retain security for short-term power outages. Magnetic locks possess a number of advantages over conventional locks and electric strikes. For example, their durability and quick operation can make them valuable in a high-traffic office environment where electronic authentication is necessary.

Choosing a Door Access Control Manufacturer and Vendor

In addition to providing you with the right products, the vendor you choose will also be responsible for providing going support and helping to integrate it with any other related systems you have. There is no real standard for connectivity between access control and alarms, time and attendance and video surveillance, so there will always be some additional custom work involved in creating links between these systems. Most important, there are local and national codes governing the types of locks and hardware that can be used on fire and exit doors, so make sure you are familiar with the ordinances in your area.

Reuse equipment

Do not overbuy – Securing door after door inside your facility is likely to frustrate employees more than increase security. Do not feel like you have to include every door in a security access control system: a mix of card access and plain old keys is often the best combination. Focus your access control points on the perimeter of your building.

If someone tries to jimmy this lock or force their way in, this Schlage will emit a piercing siren, which will warn away any intruders. This lock also has the highest possible security rating. You can program in up to 30 codes, and the touch screen is smudge- and fingerprint-resistant. The Touchscreen Deadbolt doesn’’t have its own app, but you can connect it to a smart home hub to control it remotely.

This HomeKit-compatible lock lets you use Siri to open your front door; too bad it doesn’t work with other smart home hubs, like the Schlage Connect. It can be programmed with up to 30 different codes. It also has the highest possible security rating, and an alarm if someone tries to break in.

Forget your keys? No problem. In fact, the T1L doesn’t even have a key slot, making it potentially more secure from burglars who might try to pick the lock. You can program up to 2codes, and the lock’s small and stylish design will blend in nicely with any décor. While it doesn’t have a standalone app, the T1L can be connected to, and controlled by, several different smart home systems. If the batteries inside the lock die, you can connect a 9-volt battery to gain temporary access to your house — a nice feature.

Key to Information

If buyers who don’t have an agent want to tour a home where one is required, they can use TOOR’s on-demand service to find a licensed real estate agent through the app. They’ll preview and select an agent who will accompany them at the property. The service is expected to debut in Dallas in October, when Desinor hopes to begin shipping the first round of lockbox orders. He hasn’t determined pricing for the agent matching service yet, but Desinor says it will vary by region and should be in line with the fees charged by other lead–generation tools on the market.

Protect your senior from theft or fraud by removing or taking inventory of valuables, not keeping cash around, and watching bank and credit card statements carefully.

Keep an inventory of valuables in the home. Compile a list and take pictures to document your parent’s valuables, put them under lock and key, or remove them from the home.

Don’t forget about hidden jewelry or valuables, and think about removing any valuable memorabilia displayed in the house. There’s no need to put temptation in front of anyone.

Don’t invite petty theft. Your parent should keep only a small amount of cash at home. Don’t leave money in obvious places, such as the nightstand next to the bed. Make sure your loved one keeps any checkbook, ATM and credit cards, and computer passwords in a secure place.

Pay Attention

After spending some time with the hired caregiver, pay attention to how you feel about them in your gut. Most people work hard to make a great impression at the start of a new job. But later, you might start to see a different personality show through.

If you start to feel uneasy, trust your gut and talk with their agency. If it’s a private hire, you might want to investigate for theft and (secretly) observe them carefully for a while.

Whether using a home care agency or hiring an independent caregiver, it’s important to do your research to make sure that you’re getting a reliable person.

Of course, no one knows better than me that this isn’t a foolproof method — but due diligence is still required on your part.

Home care agencies are responsible for fingerprinting and screening to make sure potential aides don’t have criminal records or other complaints against them.

Amy Nelson, founder and CEO of Accurate Home Care in Otsego, Minn., says that her agency reports theft accusations to the authorities and cooperates however possible. The caregiver is suspended until the investigation is over. If found guilty of theft, the caregiver is fired and reported to the Department of Human Services.

After you’ve picked an agency, it’s still wise to interview caregivers they assign to the job. If you don’t feel comfortable — at any time that the person is working for you — tell the agency that this person is not the right match for you.

When hiring an aide without going through an agency, spend the time and money to check them out, advises Lisa A. Lieberman, a licensed clinical social worker, family counselor and author of A ‘Stranger’ Among Us: Hiring In-Home Support for a Child with Autism Spectrum Disorders or Other Neurological Differences.

She stresses checking references, especially ones from previous employers, and scheduling a face-to-face interview before making a decision.

Unfortunately, these precautions aren’t enough to guarantee you won’t get ripped off. Detective Mike Cruce of the Oro Valley, Ariz., police department, who solved the case of my missing laptop, warned that just because the prospective caregiver doesn’t have a criminal record doesn’t mean that you still can’t be victimized by them.

Trust Your Instincts

Most people try to make a good first impression, so keep in mind that caregivers need to earn your trust and maintain it by being reliable over time. If you develop an uneasy feeling about a caregiver and aren’t quite sure they can be trusted, you could be right.

Everyone in the household should be comfortable with the caregiver. If you live alone, ask visiting family members and friends for their opinions of the caregiver and how she/he interacts with you.

In my case, my caregiver the laptop thief was shy but likable at the beginning — but after a few weekends with her, I began to wonder if I could trust her. It wasn’t one particular thing she did but a strange feeling that entered the room along with her. I began to secretly look after my wallet. She started showing up late, or not coming at all, and her excuses were hard to believe.

At that time, I should have called the agency and requested another caregiver. But I figured I was stuck with her, because the agency had been having trouble finding a caregiver to work in my part of town. This is a very real issue for people with disabilities nationwide; many people accept personal care attendants who are abusive because there is no one else to fill the gap.

Don’t Be So Darn Nice

The caregiver in this case asked to borrow his Bible for a couple of days, but after weeks went by and she still hadn’t returned it, Kelley, 44, confronted her. She assured him that she would bring it back. After a month passed and still no Bible, he called the home health agency, which contacted the caregiver — but she still didn’t bring it back.

Kelley eventually got his Bible back after the detective told his caregiver that Kelley would press charges against her if she didn’t return it. The detective warned that she didn’t want it on her record, especially since she’s a health care worker.

Caregivers and House Keys

In the case of the house keys, the best way to prevent that scenario is to never give the caregiver a permanent set. Instead, buy a key lockbox, like those used by real estate agents, and hang it on your front door handle with a key or keys inside.

When a caregiver arrives at your home for work, he or she just punches in the code to the lockbox (like this Master Lock Select Access Key Storage Box pictured above) and retrieves the key — and then returns it to the lockbox after opening the door. The lockbox code is easily changed, meaning you don’t need to change your locks every time you change caregivers.

Protect Your Stuff

Detective Cruce says it’s especially important for those with multiple caregivers, or with a “revolving door” of caregivers who are new each time, to secure their valuables. Having multiple caregivers definitely complicates theft investigations, making it difficult to pinpoint who’s responsible for missing items.

After the digital camera incident, Cohen also realized she could take measures herself to avoid enabling theft in her home. So to safeguard her valuables — from otherwise trusted eyes as well as the hands of strangers — she bought a safe.

But theft is not limited to physical possessions. Be sure to monitor bank accounts and credit card charges and look for anything unusual. Staying aware of your financial situation and transactions may help detect a theft. Also, hide important documents and consider storing duplicate copies in a safe place with family members or friends.

For example, Kelley learned the hard way that it’s wise to always request a receipt when the caregiver returns from shopping for you. He gave one of his caregivers his food stamp card to go to the store for him one afternoon, and she didn’t bring back a receipt. “It was a red flag when she didn’t bring back a receipt, so I waited until she left and went back over to the store with my food stamp card, and I told them that I needed them to run an audit on the card,” Kelley says.

Break the Cycle

My support coordinator said that the whereabouts of my laptop were still unknown but that my caregiver’s ride had called the agency and reported that she had bragged about stealing it from beneath my bed. My support coordinator also told me that my caregiver had quit the day before.

I decided to press charges against my caregiver thief because I didn’t want this happening to anyone else. Later, I heard from the prosecutor that she had similar charges before, which were dropped by the client. The fact that she already had a second chance and blew it made me feel a little better about pressing charges.

Minimizing Stranger Danger

Allowing a “stranger,” even a professional caregiver with good references, into your home can be a scary proposition. But deciding when and how to work with outside caregivers is far less daunting if you assess your options and perform due diligence to evaluate candidates for the position.

Lisa A. Lieberman’s A ‘Stranger’ Among Us: Hiring In-Home Support for a Child with Autism Spectrum Disorders or Other Neurological Differences offers readers, especially parents, tips on how to do just that.

 

 

 

 

How to save up to 86%? Here is little trick.

You must visit the page of sales. Here is the link. If you don’t care about which brand is better, then you can choose the key lock box by the price and buy from the one who will offer the greatest discount.

 

 

Final Word

First of all thanks for reading my article to the end! I hope you find my reviews listed here useful and that it allows you to make a proper comparison of what is best to fit your needs and budget. Don’t be afraid to try more than one product if your first pick doesn’t do the trick.

Most important, have fun and choose your key lock box wisely! Good luck!

So, TOP3 of key lock box

 

 

Questions? Leave a comment below!

Chatting about key lock box is my passion! Leave me a question in the comments, I answer each and every one and would love to get to know you better!



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